Diy Mobile Miter Saw Stand +Giveaway!

Disclosure: This post is sponsored by Simpson Strong-Tie®,  however the creative ingenuity and opinions expressed are completely my own.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Stand Feature 1

Can you believe that I’ve had my miter saw for over two years and I’ve never had a proper stand for it? I don’t even have a real workbench.  I’ve improvised using card tables, saw horses and even my kitchen counter. With all the building projects I have lined up this year, I needed to take care of some basic necessities.

I’ve partnered up with Simpson Strong-Tie® to build something awesome using their

 Workbench Hardware Kit.

Simpson Strong-Tie Miter Saw Stand

When the kit says “Just add lumber” it means just that.  It has the connectors and fasteners needed to make any bench/stand/shelf with four corners. It was so easy that I was able to construct this mobile miter saw stand in just a few hours.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Bench-2

If you would like to build the workbench displayed on the box, you can find the plans here and the kit can be purchased here.

To suit my needs, I modified the plans so that it would accommodate my 23″ wide miter saw.  I headed to Home Depot and bought (7) 2×4’s and a full sheet of 3/4″ Birch Plywood.  I had to sift through a lot of boards to find good 2×4’s that weren’t warped, twisted or cupped.  In order to fit the plywood into my car I had Home Depot rip the full sheet in half. That way I could make my exact cuts at home and not have to wrestle with a full sheet of plywood.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Bench-3

I trimmed the ends of each board to ensure that my joints would fit together nice and snug.

I started with the 29-1/4″ corner posts and I measured and marked 1-1/2″ from the TOP  of the board. The easiest way to do this accurately is with a combination square.

On the opposite end of the boards, I also measured and marked “6” from the BOTTOM of the boards.

These markings tell me exactly where to place the connectors.

Simpson Strong Tie Mobile Miter Saw Stand

I clamped the connectors in place and inserted the screws into the outside of the post.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Bench-7

With all eight of the connectors in place, it was time to add the 17″ side rails.

In the photo below, you can see that I placed pocket holes in the bottom rails so that I could later screw the plywood top on from the underside.  This is a matter of personal preference and is not necessary to build this mobile miter saw stand.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Bench-10

Once I attached all four of the 17″ rails, It was time to add the 57″ rails for the bottom shelf.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Bench-11

I sat them in place but did not yet add the screws.  I took a measurement of the bottom shelf so that I could cut the plywood to the exact length and width.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Bench-12

I used a scrap 2×4 to trace out my notches for the corner posts.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Bench-8

 I notched out the corners using my jigsaw.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Bench-9

I dropped the plywood shelf in place and then clamped and screwed the rails to the connectors.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Stand

Had I attached the screws, it would have been very difficult to place the shelf.

Once the shelf was in place, I added the screws to the inside corners.  The brackets held so tight that it wasn’t necessary to screw the bottom shelf in.

But because I’m a overbuilder I did it anyway.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Bench-15

To build the recessed area for the miter saw to sit, I screwed and glued together one of the 21″ boards between two 16-1/2″ boards on their ends.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Bench-16

Then I clamped and screwed them into the connectors.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Stand

I trimmed the two remaining 57″ boards to 49″.

I flipped the mobile miter saw stand over and screwed the 49″ boards to the bottom of the top shelf.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Bench-19

I countersunk 2-1/2″ screws into each side .

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Bench-20

To support the sides of the miter saw, I trimmed the two remaining 21″ boards to fit perpendicularly between the two 49″ boards with 1-1/2″ overhang.

During the planning stage, I measured the height of my miter saw and found it to be 4-1/4″ tall.  The miter saw will sit on top of a 3/4″ piece of plywood. This would cause the top of the saw table to sit 3/4″ higher than the sides of the saw stand.  To remedy this, I trimmed the top of the 2×4’s with 3/4″ plywood that I glued and nailed down.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Bench-22

I trimmed the center piece of plywood to 24″ w x 24″ w and secured it with 2″ screws from the bottom.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Bench-23

I trimmed two more pieces of 3/4 plywood to 18″ w x 24″ l .

I temporarily placed the plywood on top of the mobile miter saw stand and checked for level.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Bench-26

I secured the plywood with glue and nails.  To prevent splinters, I gave all the edges a quick sanding with 150 sandpaper and sealed the plywood with a few coats of polyurethane.

And just so you know, here are my finished dimensions prior to adding the casters.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Stand

I’m a sucker for color, I spray painted some utility handles and empty tin cans red and attached them to the stand. If I knew how to make galvanized steel paintable, I would have sprayed the connectors red too.

Spray Painted Handles and screws

I added 4″ locking casters to my miter saw stand to make it mobile.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Bench -39

Screws and nails do not hold well in the end grain of wood. So I added two pieces of laminated plywood to the bottom of the stand and screwed the casters into that.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Bench -36

Between the casters and the piece of laminated plywood, the height of the mobile miter saw stand is 36-1/4″ .  The perfect working height for my 5′ 10″ frame.

Diy Mobile Miter Saw Stand

Diy Mobile Miter Saw Stand

The tin cans place pencils, measuring devices and safety goggles within quick reach.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Bench -30

To avoid potential tip-over, the saw can be bolted to the stand.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Stand

The handles make maneuvering the stand a piece of cake.

This kit is so versatile that the possibilities are endless. I can’t wait to tackle my garage and build a workbench and the small shed I mentioned here.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Stand

So what do you think?  Do you like? Do you want /need to build one of your own?  If so then you’re in luck.

The friendly folks over at Simpson Strong -Tie® provided me with an extra Workbench Hardware Kit and a $50 Home Depot gift card to give away so that you too can build something awesome.

Update: The Winner of the Simpson Strong-Tie Hardware Kit and $50 Home Depot Gift Card is 

Entry #47 Liz W.

Liz Wright says

I love this! Much more functional than our current setup for our miter saw. Wish I had known about these kits earlier. I would totally build the exact same thing, red handles and all.

Check your email Liz  to claim your goods.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Also, Be sure to check out facebook.com/diydoneright for a chance to win $2,000 worth of power tools and hardware as well as some more Diy inspiration.

Simpson Strong Tie Miter Saw Stand Feature 2

Signature Post

Comments

  1. says

    You nailed it again! I had an existing square trolley (for a rarely used router table) and I extended it to duplicate your amazing mitre saw table. Greatest idea yet as supporting heavy 2 x 4’s on skinny side supports usually means off 90 degree cuts thus wrecking a great work of wood art. This solves lousy cuts and wasted wood too. also provides extra work space for a Kreg pocket hole jig setup too. Thanks Ayisha…you rock.

  2. Liz Wright says

    I love this! Much more functional than our current setup for our miter saw. Wish I had known about these kits earlier. I would totally build the exact same thing, red handles and all.

  3. Caitlin says

    I am totally loving your blog and this stand is fantastic. I’m a newbie but I think I could probably build something like this with that kit and I’ve been looking at buying a miter saw!

    • Ayisha says

      Thanks Caitlin. You could totally build this. If I didn’t have the tools to do all the cutting, I would do like I used to and have my local lumber yard make my cuts for FREE!

  4. Danielle says

    Wow cool kit! Never knew there were stuff like that. A table like that would be perfect for cutting up all trim I hope to use in my future wainscoting projects.

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